Tag Archives: Commodity Classics

Great Questions About The Solar Eclipse

I’ve had the pleasure of working with Michael Yorba for a number of years now, initially when he first got started with his “Commodity Classics” TV show (he was a pioneer in online broadcasting, back in the pre-Neflix days when there was still net neutrality and there was barely enough bandwidth to get a signal through), and more recently as a regular commentator on his Traders Network radio show, which is broadcast live KFXR-1190 AM radio in Dallas-Ft. Worth, Texas and streamed to listeners around the world via the internet.

One of the great things about Michael is that he’s a trader himself, so he really knows what he’s talking about when he discusses the markets on the radio.

He’s also worked hard to become knowledgeable about astro-trading.

When Michael Yorba and I first started working together, he didn’t know anything at all about planetary influences in the markets. But he got a copy of one of the early editions of The Basic Stock Market Astrology Home Study Course from me, and diligently worked through all the lessons. He’s considerably expanded his astro-trading expertise since then.

That’s why it was no surprise to me during our interview time on his Traders Network show yesterday, when he asked me some probing, to-the-point questions about the impact of the big solar eclipse we’ve got coming up next Tuesday.

He had me on for two segments of the program, so we had plenty of time to get into depth about the time and location of the eclipse, the connections it has with current geopolitical strife, the effects we’re expecting in the markets, our trading philosophy here at FinancialCyclesWeekly.com, the new monograph on The Solar Eclipse of April 2014: Its Impact on the Markets, and a whole lot more.

Along the way, we even got in some conversation about Apple Computer (AAPL) and the S&P 500, referring to charts that I had posted on his social network page as well as on this blog. To take a look at them now, just CLICK HERE.

The recording of this interview is in two segments:

Here’s the first one:


click here to download or listen on your mobile device

And here’s the second part:


click here to download or listen on your mobile device

By the way, if you haven’t signed up yet for the webinar that’s mentioned in the interview, you need to do that right away. It’s a free event, but you need to register ahead of time. You can do that at:

http://www.onlinemeetingnow1.com/register/?id=a4554d0803

 

Why the Video Archive is So Important

I spoke on the phone yesterday with Michael Yorba, the developer of the Yorba.TV online television network and the host of the “Commodity Classics” show.

During the past couple of years Michael has repeatedly invited me to be a guest on “Commodity Classics”, and in most cases I’ve been able to join him on the show for interviews going out live around the world via the web. The program has introduced a lot of people to financial astrology, and I’ve made new friends on virtually every continent.

But during the past month the show has been off the air, and that’s what Michael was talking to me about yesterday. You see, in 2007 and 2008 he put huge amounts of his own money into Yorba.TV, basically keeping the whole venture running out of his own pocket.

That was certainly a very expensive proposition, but along the way Michael has become one of the world’s few experts in producing real-time live streaming video for the internet. While there’s already plenty of pre-recorded video on the web, from YouTube on down, being able to broadcast live, with real-time interactive feedback from around the globe while the broadcast is taking place, is another thing altogether.

Michael Yorba knows how to do it, and the results he has gotten so far have been quite exciting.

But there’s been a problem. So far he hasn’t been able to attract advertisers who are willing to put their money on the line to be a part of this revolution in online video. Because live streaming video is still so new, the companies who might otherwise have become advertisers have been reluctant to take a chance with Yorba.TV.

And then there’s the little matter of the current economic meltdown, too….

To make a long story short, “Commodity Classics” is now off the air indefinitely, unless some new funding arrives to get things rolling again.

I’m optimistic about that possibility, but it hasn’t happened yet. And that’s why the archive of videos from my past appearances on “Commodity Classics” is so valuable. It’s the only record of these ground-breaking broadcasts.

At this point, my team is just getting started with posting the videos on the new website. But it’s really important work, and I know we will all stay focused on it until the job is done.