Tag Archives: North Carolina

Uranus Hurricane Intensifies Dramatically

Hurricane Dorian, this week’s powerful Uranus Hurricane, is intensifying.

We’re calling it a Uranus Hurricane here. That’s because of the noteworthy meeting of Uranus lines on our astro-map for the storm.

As we noted a couple of days ago, this combination could make for a stronger storm.

That’s exactly what’s happening.

Earlier today Dorian was bumped up to a Category 5 event. It now has sustained winds of over 185 mph.

That’s massive.

In fact, it’s so overwhelming that it’s tied for the biggest storm on record.

Its winds match the force of the legendary Labor Day Hurricane of 1935.

According to Andrew Buncombe of The Independent, Dorian has “gusts of up to 220 mph and a sustained speed of 185 mph. When it struck land twice on Sunday afternoon first in the Abaco Islands at then close to Marsh Harbour on Great Abaco Island, it equalled a record set by a Labour Day storm from 1935. That storm – which occurred before hurricanes were given names – ultimately left major damage in its wake in the Florida Keys.”

A Uranus Hurricane Cycle

1935.

For most people, that may just seem like far-away history.

But for an astrologer, it strikes an immediate chord.

1935 was 84 years ago. And 84 years is a Uranus orbital cycle.

So Hurricane Dorian is definitely a Uranus Hurricane!

The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 was the most intense Atlantic hurricane on record until Hurricane Gilbert in 1988.

It was the first know Category 5 hurricane to strike the United States.

The storm caused catastrophic damage in the upper Florida Keys. A storm surge of 18 to 20 feet swept over the low-lying islands. Strong winds and the huge surge destroyed nearly all the structures between Tavernier and Marathon. The hurricane completely obliterated the town of Islamorada.

After tracking up Florida’s west coast in the Gulf of Mexico and devastating much of the Tampa Bay area, the Labor Day Uranus Hurricane made a second landfall at Cedar Key, Florida. It later caused extensive damage in the Florida panhandle, Georgia, and the Carolinas.

Hurricane Victim Cremation
Mass cremation of Labor Day Hurricane victims at Snake Creek, Florida, September 7, 1935.

A total of 485 people lost their lives. It took six months following the Labor Day Hurricane  to recover all the bodies.

Looking At The Astrology

It’s clearly too early to tell how Hurricane Dorian will compare with the events of 1935. Even so, the Uranus Hurricane connection is quite compelling.

Here’s the horoscope for the Labor Day Hurricane landfall 84 years ago;

Uranus Hurricane 1935

Here’s the chart from earlier today when Hurricane Dorian made its first landfall:

Uranus Hurricane 2019

The key points, of course, are the positions of the Sun (8 to 9 degrees Virgo) and Uranus (5 to 6 degrees Taurus).

There’s much more to do in the way of detailed analysis here.

But for now it’s time to go check the weather forecast. This Uranus Hurricane isn’t over yet.

Losing Mom Unexpectedly

My Mom died last Sunday.

Margaret Bost Photo
Margaret Martha Vedder Bost
Oct. 26, 1924 – Jan. 8, 2017

Margaret Vedder Bost, my Mom, was 92 years old, and had had a rich and deeply rewarding life, so her passing wasn’t entirely unexpected.

Reading her obituary, I’m struck by the scope of her accomplishments – after all, she was mainly just Mom to me.

Even so, I have to admit that I’m really still in shock.

A Christmas Visit

My Mom and Dad have shared an apartment in a North Carolina assisted living facility for some time now, and in recent months my Dad’s physical health concerns have seemed much more serious than my Mom’s.

But when I arrived at their apartment for a visit on the afternoon of Christmas Day, it was my Mom who was suffering.

She complained that she’d had a bad cold for four or five days, and couldn’t seem to shake it.

During my visit I suggested that we would get her to a doctor if her condition hadn’t improved by the following morning. That seemed to reassure her.

Then I went to spend the evening at my sister’s house, about 20 minutes away.

Emergency Room

At breakfast the next day, my sister got a call from the assisted living facility.

My Mom’s oxygen levels had been dropping precipitously. They had taken her to the emergency room at a nearby hospital.

We went right over.

The rest of the day was full of tests, consultations with physicians, and the complications of getting her admitted and situated in a hospital room.

She was having difficulty breathing, so was getting some assistance from respiratory care, but the real challenges were congestive heart failure and a nearly total loss of kidney function.

The End

I stayed in town a couple of extra days, so I could get to the hospital for multiple visits.

My Mom’s condition seemed to be stabilizing a bit, and there was talk of ongoing care strategies. So I felt a reduced sense of urgency and left town. I returned home to Florida a few days later.

But not long after I got back home, Mom was moved to a hospice facility for end-of-life care. She died there in the early morning hours on Sunday, January 8, just a little over seven months shy of her 70th wedding anniversary.

Remembering Mom

Patty and I returned to North Carolina to participate in a memorial service for her on Saturday.

It was truly a wonderful time, quite comforting and uplifting. My childhood friend Dick Fritz, who is now the pastor at the Lutheran church Mom and Dad attended, officiated at the service. He added a personal, loving touch. And it was heartwarming to embrace cousins, children, nieces and nephews who had traveled great distances to join us for the event.

But as always with the passing of a loved one, there are so many things left unsaid. And there are so many memories that reappear unexpectedly.

The Mystery of Time

Like the conversation I had with my Mom when I was about 5 years old. I asked her when I was born.

“You were born at exactly 1:23 a.m.,” she replied. “I remember it exactly, because the time was one-two-three!”

The wonder of having an exact birth time. It was, no doubt, my earliest inspiration for becoming an astrologer!

But death, like birth, perpetually reminds us of just how precious and mysterious time really is.

As Aldous Huxley said, “There seems to be plenty of it.”

But when someone leaves us, the opposite seems to be the case.

Maybe my Dad, who’s 91 now, said it best the day before my Mom died. The assisted living staff had taken him to the hospice for a good-bye visit with my Mom, whom he had married in 1947.

One of the staff members asked him, “How long have you and your wife been married?”

“Not nearly long enough,” he said.

Saying Goodbye To My Brother

I’ve been saying goodbye to a loved one, and I’m feeling really tired.

Part of my fatigue is no doubt due to an intense travel schedule during the past week – I flew to Pennsylvania to help conduct a memorial service for my youngest brother Otto. That meant I had to deal with the usual stresses of airline security, crowded airports, and inconvenient timing.

I had a late connection coming back home to Florida. My Uber driver dropped me off at 2:00 a.m. on Tuesday morning.

I’m still trying to get back onto a regular sleep schedule. That has added to my weariness as well.

But on top of that, I’ve been getting a first-hand understanding of just how physically exhausting grief can be. It’s really taken me by surprise.

A Sudden Departure

The biggest surprise of all, though, was the fact that Otto died in the first place. He passed away suddenly on July 26, while he was vacationing in the North Carolina mountains. With him were his three adult children, his daughter-in-law, and his granddaughter, who will be 2 years old in October.

The day before he died, the whole crew took a day trip to visit with our parents, who are both in their early 90’s. Our other two siblings joined them there. It was a great family gathering.

It was also a wonderful opportunity for saying goodbye, although nobody knew that’s what they were doing at the time.

I missed that occasion, however. So I was glad that I had a chance to go deliver the eulogy at Otto’s memorial service last Sunday in Pennsylvania. He and I had been really close, even though I was 12 older than him and even though we spent most of our years widely separated by geography.

Otto Bost - Saying Goodbye
J. Otto Bost –  August 27, 1960 – July 26, 2016

It was truly rewarding for me to be so closely united with him, and to be a part of the final celebration of his life as we were saying goodbye to Otto.

It was also good to get better acquainted with my niece and nephews. With their Dad gone now, I’m sure we’ll find a need for stronger connections in future years.

An Excuse To Slow Down

And in a way I’m also grateful for the grief and the fatigue. They’ve slowed me down a bit. In the process I’ve found a much-needed opportunity for quiet reflection. I’ve been thinking about Otto, of course, but also about family and love and the remarkable comfort of the cycles in our lives.

As we were saying goodbye during the memorial service, Otto’s son Steven read aloud some verses from the great astrological book of Ecclesiastes. They keep running through my mind:

“To everything there is a season, and a time for every purpose under the heaven: A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted. . . .”

 

Is This Just The Pause Before the Coming Stock Market Trading Storm?

I’m currently in the midst of a couple of weeks of travel, combining the business of helping astro-traders in various parts of the country with the pleasure of participating in a couple of family weddings on back-to-back weekends.

Right now I’m in the mountains of western North Carolina, preparing for an outdoor wedding ceremony and an evening of festivities to follow. We’ve got great weather, which has the blushing bride breathing a big sigh of relief!

But even during a holiday weekend and a great occasion like this one, the opportunities in the markets don’t disappear completely. That’s why I’ve been grabbing a few spare moments this afternoon to review the planetary trends that are likely to dominate the market action next week.

As I told Michael Yorba during my weekly radio interview with him on his Traders Network radio program on Thursday, the week ahead of us brings the Moon into sharp focus as we look for potential shifts in stock market trading trends.

We’ve got a lunar return to the recent Solar Eclipse, an entire trading day with a void-of-course Moon, and then a New Moon to top it all off.

You can get the details and hear the complete conversation from Thursday’s interview here:

click here to download or listen on your mobile device

By the way, near the end of the interview I mention the fact that the special e-book on The Solar Eclipse of April 2014: Its Impact on the Markets is available now at a 25% discount if you use the Coupon Code YORBA when you place your order. That Coupon Code is good through the end of the day on Monday, so to take advantage of the savings you’ll want to to go to http://bit.ly/Eclipse1404 to place your order while there’s still time.